The Region

By the Numbers: China and the United States

Published December 1, 2003  |  December 2003 issue

(Data are for 2003 unless otherwise noted)

General

China

U.S.

Land area, in square kilometers

9.33 million

9.16 million

Population (July 2003 est.)

1,286,975,468

290,342,554

65 years or older

7.4%

12.4%

Median age (2002)

31.5 years

35.8 years

In urban areas

32%

76%

Annual growth rate

0.60%

0.92%

Health and Education 1

 

 

Infant mortality rate,
 deaths per 1,000 births

25.26

6.75

Life expectancy at birth, years

72.22

77.14

Literacy rate
 (of population age 15 and over)

86%

97%

College graduates
 (of population 25 and over)

5.2%

25.6%

Percent of GDP spent on education

2.2%

5.0%

Economic 2

 

 

GDP (2002)

$1.27 trillion

$10.45 trillion

GDP adjusted for purchasing power  parity (PPP) 3 (2002)

$6.14 trillion

$10.23 trillion

Per capita GDP adjusted for PPP 3  (2002)

$4,778

$35,442

GDP real annual growth rate (2002)

8.0%

2.5%

Inflation rate (2002)

-0.80%

1.60%

Unemployment rate (2002)

3.1% 4

5.8%

Government gross debt
 as percent of GDP (2002) 5

25.6%

58.8%

 

 

 

Labor force

760 million

130 million

In agriculture

50%

2%

In manufacturing, mining and construction

22%

19%

In services

28%

79%

Hourly pay in manufacturing (2001)

$0.61

$16.14

 

 

 

Exports, f.o.b. (2002)

$325.6 billion

$687 billion

Imports, f.o.b. (2002)

$295.3 billion

$1.165 trillion

Imports as share of GDP (2002)

23%

11%

Exports as share of GDP (2002)

26%

7%

 

 

 

Number of companies on stock exchange (2002)

1,154

6,355

Market capitalization of those companies (2001)

$542 billion

$13,984 trillion

 

 

 

Consumer Data 6

 

 

Automobiles per 1,000 people

6

475

Bicycles per 1,000 people

583

361

Personal computers per 1,000 people

19

625

Living space, square foot per capita

66

718

Electric power consumption,
 kilowatt-hours per capita

827

12,322

Sources

International Monetary Fund, World Bank, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, U.S. State Department, CIA World Factbook, World Almanac, U.S. Census, China's National Bureau of Statistics

Notes

1 Most recent year available.

2 Figures are in U.S. dollars.

3 GDP adjustments for purchasing power parity allow for better comparison of economic well-being among countries by factoring in local costs of living as well as foreign exchange rates.

4 Unofficial estimates are considerably higher.

5 In principle, both figures (from the IMF) include debt from central, state/provincial and local governments, but because subnational governments in China are not legally permitted to incur debt, this IMF estimate officially reflects China's central government debt.

6 Most recent year available.

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