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Economic Impact Beyond Tribal Economies

A conversation on how Native involvement in gaming and federal contracting contributes to local economic development

July 17, 2024 | 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. CT
Virtual video event

Economic Impact Beyond Tribal Economies

We invite you to join us July 17 for Economic Impact Beyond Tribal Economies, a Center for Indian Country Development (CICD) event exploring the local economic impacts of the two largest and fastest-growing sources of revenue for Native communities: gaming and federal contracting.

Tribally owned casinos generate substantial revenue, which is often reinvested into the community. But little is known about their impact on their surrounding economies. Recent research by CICD shows how tribally owned casinos affect nearby businesses.

Federal contracting is a rapidly expanding source of revenue for tribes and Alaska Native Corporations (ANCs) and a sustainable source of income for Native Hawaiian Organizations (NHOs). Recent CICD research finds that tribal enterprises, ANCs, and NHOs—collectively known as Native entity enterprises—regularly subcontract to non-Native small businesses.

In this webinar, CICD researchers will present their findings on how gaming and federal contracting impact local businesses and economies. Guest panelists will underscore how Native entity enterprises enhance economic diversification, foster entrepreneurship, and strengthen economic infrastructure across various local economies in and outside of Indian Country. Participants will hear from this dynamic line-up, ask questions, and explore the lessons Native entities have learned as they continue to pursue viable and sustainable revenue-development opportunities. We hope you’ll be part of this important conversation!

Speakers:

  • Randall Akee, Chair, American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program; and Associate Professor, Department of Public Policy; UCLA
  • Jacqui Baldwin-LeClair, Policy Analyst, CICD, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
  • Elliot Charette, Senior Research Assistant, CICD, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
  • Casey Lozar, Vice President and Director, CICD, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
  • Tralynna Sherrill Scott, Chief Economist, Cherokee Nation Businesses

Event Details

Virtual video event

Event Agenda

Wednesday, July 17, 2024

2:00 p.m.–2:05 p.m. CT Welcome, Overview, and Introductions 
Speaker: Casey Lozar (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes), CICD, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
2:05 p.m.–2:15 p.m. CT Gaming Spillover 
Presenter: Elliot Charette (Lac Du Flambeau and Red Cliff Bands of Lake Superior Chippewa), CICD, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
2:15 p.m.–2:25 p.m. CT Interconnection of Native Entity Enterprises to Small Business Subcontractors
Presenter: Jacqui Baldwin-LeClair, CICD, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
2:25 p.m.–2:45 p.m. CT Panel: Federal Contracting and Tribal Economic Development
Moderator: Casey Lozar (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes), CICD, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Panelists:
  • Randall Akee (Native Hawaiian), UCLA
  • Tralynna Sherrill Scott (Cherokee Nation), Cherokee Businesses
2:45 p.m.–2:55 p.m. CT Q&A:
  • Randall Akee
  • Jacqui Baldwin-LeClair
  • Elliot Charette
  • Tralynna Sherrill Scott
2:55 p.m.–3:00 p.m. CT Closing Remarks and Preview of Coming Events

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Presenter Information

Randall Akee

Randall Akee Native Hawaiian
Associate Professor, UCLA

Randall Akee is an associate professor in the Department of Public Policy and chair of the American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program at UCLA. Previously, he served as a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution. Akee completed his doctorate at Harvard University in June 2006. He is an applied microeconomist and has worked in the areas of labor economics, economic development, and migration. He also spent several years working for the State of Hawaii Office of Hawaiian Affairs Economic Development Division. Akee is a research fellow at the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Jacqui Baldwin-LeClair

Jacqui Baldwin-LeClair Policy Analyst, Center for Indian Country Development

Jacqui Baldwin-LeClair is a policy analyst for CICD, where she examines issues and policy solutions in support of the economic self-determination and prosperity of Native nations and Indigenous communities. Baldwin-LeClair’s areas of expertise include Native federal contracting, Native entity enterprise development, and taxation in Indian Country. Prior to joining the Minneapolis Fed, she coordinated disaster services for the American Red Cross of Montana. She holds a Master of Public Administration from the University of Montana and a J.D. from the University of Montana’s Alexander Blewett III School of Law with a certificate in federal Indian law.

Elliot Charette

Elliot Charette Lac Du Flambeau and Red Cliff Bands of Lake Superior Chippewa
Senior Research Assistant, CICD

Elliot Charette is a senior research assistant at CICD. Before joining the Minneapolis Fed, Charette was a staff economist for the Council of Economic Advisers. At the Council, he covered issues related to macroeconomics and international trade.

Charette is currently a Ph.D. student in applied economics at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. He is an enrolled member of the Lac Du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa.

Casey Lozar

Casey Lozar Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes
Vice President and Director, CICD, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis

Casey Lozar is a vice president at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and director of CICD, a research and policy institute that works to advance the economic self-determination and prosperity of Native nations and Indigenous communities. Before assuming leadership of CICD, he was assistant vice president/outreach executive in the Bank’s department of Public Affairs, and the leader of our Helena Branch.

Prior to joining the Minneapolis Fed in 2018, Lozar served in economic development and higher education roles for the State of Montana. Additionally, he held executive leadership positions in national Native American nonprofits, including the American Indian College Fund and the Notah Begay III Foundation.

He received degrees from Dartmouth College and Harvard University and an MBA from the University of Colorado-Denver. He serves on the Montana Board of Regents of Higher Education (past chair).

Lozar is the 2021 recipient of the Janet L. Yellen Award for Excellence in Community Development and a 2022 recipient of the Honorary Leadership Award from the Native American Finance Officers Association.

A Montana native, he was raised on the Flathead Indian Reservation and is an enrolled member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.

Tralynna Sherrill Scott

Tralynna Sherrill Scott Cherokee Nation
Chief Economist, Cherokee Nation Businesses

Tralynna Sherrill Scott, citizen of the Cherokee Nation, is Cherokee Nation Businesses’ chief economist. She serves as the Cherokee Nation’s special envoy to the U.S. Department of the Treasury. She also serves as a CICD Leadership Council member.

Prior to assuming her role as chief economist at Cherokee Nation Businesses, Scott served as treasurer and chief financial officer of the Cherokee Nation. As treasurer, she was responsible for the $3 billion annual budget of the Cherokee Nation, including federal COVID-19 relief funding under the CARES Act and the American Rescue Plan Act. Scott has worked for the Cherokee Nation for nearly 19 years and held various positions in addition to those mentioned above, including financial analyst, investment analyst, attorney, and director of corporate taxation.